Responsible drinking is given an eco-twist in Iceland Tourism’s new campaign

We all drink more bottled water when we’re abroad, which might be advisable in some countries, but it’s really not necessary in Iceland, and it’s never good for the planet.

Brooklyn Brothers has come up with a clever way to encourage tourists in Iceland to drink eco-responsibly by creating a premium brand for the country’s tap water, now marketed under its Icelandic name, Kranavatn.

As well as a light-hearted film demonstrating that Iceland’s tap water – which comes from glaciers, is filtered by lava, and is 98 per cent chemically untreated – is one of the cleanest and best tasting waters in the world, Brooklyn Brothers has created a whole campaign around the new “brand,” working with the country’s tourism body, Inspired by Iceland.

Kranavatn-branded reusable water bottles will be available, and the water will be positioned as a “luxury” drink at restaurants, bars and hotels. There will also be a Kranavatn branded bar at the airport for arriving tourists, who can sign up to the “Kranavatn Challenge” and earn vouchers to spend at local attractions for the same amount they might have spent on water.

Guðmundur Ingi Guðbrandsson, Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources said: “Behind the humor and wit of the video and Kranavatn brand is an important message and one we’re really proud of. By encouraging tourists to ditch single use plastics and that the drinks are on us this summer, we are promoting a positive message which encourages more responsible tourist behavior in Iceland and around the world.”

MAA creative scale: 7

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About Emma Hall

Emma Hall
Emma Hall is the former London Editor of Ad Age, where she covered European marketing advertising, digital and media stories. She has written for newspapers including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph, and was previously a section editor at Campaign. Emma started her career in New York as a researcher for a biography of Keith Richards.