Cannes Lions hands out a second Grand Prix to Vice Media

Purpose has truly taken hold now that Cannes is half way through, and it’s here in the latest crop of Grand Prix.

Today’s award for displaying the least purpose — and the winner of the Grand Prix for Creative Commerce — goes to Wingstop’s “Thighstop.” It was a response to a supply chain problem that refreshed the whole business and grew its customer base.

Beth Ann Kaminkow, global CEO VMLY&R COMMERCE and CEO NY VMLY&R, was jury president. She said: “The work demonstrates the transformation that is possible when creativity is unleashed in response to the world changing. This work pivoted – bravely and holistically – to deliver big for both their customers and business. It’s commerce-led creativity that’s business driving, brand-building, and deeply engaging.”

In Brand Experience & Activation, the Grand Prix went to Vice’s “Unfiltered History Tour” by Dentsu India, which exposed the lies around some of the most famous artefacts in the British Museum. It’s the second Grand Prix for this campaign, which also came out top in the Radio & Audio Lions.

In Mobile, Google’s “Real Tone” creates a camera to show people of all colour as they really are. The innovation was created in partnership with New York Times’ T Brand Studio, Wieden+Kennedy Portland, and Gut, Miami.

The Creative Strategy Grand Prix was won by BBDO’s “The Breakaway,” a prisoner e-cycling team, for retailer Decathlon by BBDO Belgium.

Jury president Chrissie Hanson, global CSO of OMD Global, said: ‘We believe that the work we elevate to a Grand Prix sends a signal about the values that our industry should hold, and therefore the Decathlon Sports for Prisoners (Belgium) represents the brave and socially conscious moves that are possible when the strategy, media, and retail activations flow directly from the core brand purpose.”

Creative Business Transformation went to L&C New York which teamed up with pineapple producer Dole Sunshine Company to produce Piñatex, a leather alternative made with pineapples that was taken up by retailers including H&M, Nike and Hugo Boss.

The Innovation Grand Prix was won by insurance company’s Suncorp’s “One house to save many” campaign, created by Leo Burnett Sydney. The house can withstand extreme weather conditions brought about by climate change.

Innovation Lions Jury President, Cleve Gibbon, CTO of Wunderman Thompson US, said: “Every year in Australia, homes are destroyed and billions are spent on rebuilding communities due to extreme weather events. The One House set out to achieve something never done before — it democratises access to resilient housing materials to protect homes against tropical cyclones, floods, and fires.

“This housing solution was brought to life through a creative brand/agency partnership backed by the Australian government to deliver a commercially viable transformative product. As a jury, we were blown away by the boldness of the idea, the creative bravery of the execution, and the massive societal, environmental and economic impact. One House innovation has started a movement.”

The Creative Effectiveness Grand Prix went to Michelob’s “Contract for Change,” from this year’s creative marketer of the year, AB InBev.

The jury’s president, Raja Rajamannar, chief marketing & communications officer at Mastercard, said: “To pick the Creative Effectiveness Lion Grand Prix winner is to pick the best of the absolute best. The campaign we chose was not only strong on creativity and effectiveness, it went above and beyond – it is disruptive, game-changing and has impact lasting into the future. It’s a powerful example of how marketing should play an effective role in driving the business, build the brand and play a key role in the entire business value chain.”

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About Emma Hall

Emma Hall is a journalist and editorial consultant and is the former Europe Editor of Ad Age, where she covered European marketing advertising, digital and media stories. She has written for newspapers including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph, and was previously a section editor at Campaign. Emma started her career in New York as a researcher for a biography of Keith Richards.

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