David Droga outlines his vision for new Accenture Song

David Droga, CEO of newly-minted Accenture Song (formerly Accenture interactive) has been enlarging on the rebrand, saying the move the move was necessary to create a simpler model that clients could understand while also expanding the type of clients agencies are able to work on.

He goes on: “We are obviously not going to take any clients out of agencies or out of companies, but they’re part of this bigger ecosystem now that opens doors for a client that was maybe in Spain (who) now may want to talk to us in Italy or vice versa. It’s more transparent about how we unite our resources so people aren’t defending individual personalities or cultures. For clients it’s much easier for them to understand that. Now when we show up it’s as a united front from a geography and capabilities (standpoint).”

The united front doesn’t include a name change for Droga5, at least not yet, which Droga says is already well known – fair enough.

Accenture Song is, by some measures, the biggest agency company in the world, with 40 or so elements, although much of that isn’t advertising.

It’s unlikely that the story stops here: consultant Avi Dan speculates in Forbes that an IPO might be on the cards at some stage. What Accenture Song needs to avoid, he says, is becoming an ad holding company like WPP or Publicis, which have spent the past few years trying to unify their offerings, with mixed success.

This may make sense from a corporate point of view. the problem is people: does a Monkey or a Rothco or a Fjord want to be an Accenture Song? It’s a bit of a killer for social introductions. And will more orders now flow down from the top? That’s the challenge for CEO Droga.

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About Stephen Foster

Stephen is a former editor of Marketing Week and London Evening Standard advertising columnist. He wrote City Republic for Brand Republic and is a partner in communications consultancy The Editorial Partnership.