Apple stays top of Interbrand’s Global 100, but Zoom and Uber drop out

Apple leads Interbrand’s Best Global Brands report for the tenth year in a row, but  there has been some movement at the top, as Microsoft takes over the number two position from Amazon.

Nike has made it into the top ten for the first time, edging in at the expense of McDonald’s, while Instagram (16) has overtaken the seemingly ill-fated Facebook (17) as Meta’s most valuable brand.

Zoom, Uber and agricultural machinery brand John Deere all fell out of the top 100 to be replaced by Airbnb (54), Red Bull (64) and online retailer Xiaomi (84).

The top ten brands make up 53% of the total value of the whole 100, and the only British brands to make the cut are Burberry, Land Rover, and HSBC – although we could count Chanel as it apparently has its HQ in the UK.

Emma Ellis, managing director of Interbrand London said: “What customers now need more than ever is the ability to trust the actions of the brands they engage with, both in terms of what they say and do. Brands that lead with empathy at the forefront of what they do and how they do it, are the ones that will forge greater connections and benefit from stronger affinity.”

The average brand value has reached $3 trillion for the first time, and there’s a 16% increase in the table’s overall value this year. In 2022, the fastest rising brands were Microsoft, Tesla and Chanel, which outperformed in three criteria: direction, agility and participation.

Interbrand’s criteria looks at three main elements of a brand – its financial performance, the role of the brand (as opposed to price, convenience etc) in driving purchase, and the brand’s strength, which is its ability to create sustainable demand.

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About Emma Hall

Emma Hall is a journalist and editorial consultant and is the former Europe Editor of Ad Age, where she covered European marketing advertising, digital and media stories. She has written for newspapers including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph, and was previously a section editor at Campaign. Emma started her career in New York as a researcher for a biography of Keith Richards.

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