VCCP and Cadbury take home IPA Effectiveness Grand Prix

The IPA has awarded its Effectiveness Grand Prix to VCCP’s “glass and a half” campaign for Cadbury, which increased annual sales by 22% (compared to a target of 9% in five years) and rebuilt the brand at a time when two million British households had stopped buying it.

VCCP’s campaign has been running for four years, in which time Cadbury’s has become Britain’s fastest-growing grocery brand, worth over £1.4 billion a year, with annual revenues up by £261m.

Harjot Singh, convenor of judges and McCann’s global chief strategy officer, said: “This paper is a fantastic demonstration of how a purpose anchored in truth about the product can be used effectively in marketing and delivering measurable impact. It is particularly powerful in this case that the purpose was used to generate renewed love for a heritage brand. Judges highlighted the innovative multimedia integration over a long-term period.”

IPA Effectiveness stalwarts adam&eveDDB and BBH also took home prizes. The president’s prize for behavioural change was awarded to ITV for adam&eveDDB’s Veg Power campaign, and the agency also won effectiveness company of the year, while OMD Group was network of the year.

BBH, Tesco and Mediacom won the Channon Prize for best new learning for its paper “From serving shoppers to serving the nation.”

Arguably the effectiveness Grand Prix is the most coveted award in the industry because it breeds the ultimate prize: longevity in client-agency relationships.

VCCP last won the IPA Grand Prix back in 2004 for its rebranding of O2, now Virgin Media O2, which remains a client today. Likewise BBH with Tesco and Audi, and adam&eveDDB and John Lewis have remained together despite challenges along the way.

You May Also Like

About Emma Hall

Emma Hall is a journalist and editorial consultant and is the former Europe Editor of Ad Age, where she covered European marketing advertising, digital and media stories. She has written for newspapers including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph, and was previously a section editor at Campaign. Emma started her career in New York as a researcher for a biography of Keith Richards.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*