Uncommon helps us save the Bother with campaign for start-up delivering household basics

Lots of us learned to love our local shops and delis during the lockdown — if we lived in the kinds of neighbourhoods that are awash with them — leaving the supermarket shop for boring essentials like detergent, loo roll and bin bags. A new delivery service, Bother, has set up to bring those basics to your door, and enlisted Uncommon to help them build a profile.

Bother promises good deals on big name brands, as well as offering more eco-friendly alternatives. It’s all delivered without charge and there’s no need for a subscription.

It’s the kind of venture that Uncommon sets its store by. The agency set up to work with brands that “people in the real world actually wish existed,” and this fits the mould for a certain demographic at least. Even one of its bigger and more corporate clients, B&Q, just gave £23 million in Covid furlough pay back to the government.

Douglas Morton, founder & CEO at Bother said: “We are on a mission to simplify peoples’ lives and our first stop is boring household shopping. Needlessly time consuming, overly expensive and surprisingly damaging to the environment, this entire industry is increasingly unreflective of the way we live our lives. This needs to change. Bringing simplicity and fun back to boring basics: We are the alternative. We Bother, so you don’t have to. We’re really excited to get started on this exciting journey with Uncommon.”

Lucy Jameson, co-founder at Uncommon said: “Bother are a brilliant challenger brand. Shopping was due a rethink even before Coronavirus, but now it’s imperative. Bother fix a real problem. They take the bother out of shopping for all those boring basics. We can’t wait to share what we’ve been working on and help scale this disruptive new brand.”

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About Emma Hall

Emma Hall
Emma Hall is the former Europe Editor of Ad Age, where she covered European marketing advertising, digital and media stories. She has written for newspapers including the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Times and the Telegraph, and was previously a section editor at Campaign. Emma started her career in New York as a researcher for a biography of Keith Richards.

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