Deutsche Telekom targets volunteering ‘digital optimists’ with NFT-based campaign

We’ve had one mobile provider stirring up a hornets nest with ‘Not your problem’ from EE, about sexism and football (sort of.)

And here’s another going somewhat off-piste, Deutsche Telekom using a money-can’t-buy NFT ( as DT puts it) to “supercharge youth volunteering across Europe.” In both cases the agency is Saatchi & Saatchi.

Better let them explain it:

The #WhatWeValue platform uses connected technology to amplify the impact young people want to have on the world around them. In recent times, no other connected technology has generated more interest and controversy than NFTs. This project aims to flip the NFT narrative on its head and transform them from something you buy for personal gain in a virtual world, into something you earn for collective gain in the real world.

At the heart of the platform is a digital community powered by Value, a money-can’t-buy NFT for ‘good’. The platform is open to volunteer project leaders aged between 18 and 30 from across the brand’s European footprint to host their own volunteering projects. Diverse categories include gender, racial and social equality, disability advocacy, climate change, urban regeneration, mental wellbeing, migration and more.

DT chief brand officer Ulrich Klenke adds: “We are consistently in awe of this socially conscious and action orientated generation. Volunteerism is a key example of how young people are using connected technologies to create real world action and transform our lives for the better.

“We call this ‘digital optimism’. With #WhatWeValue, we continue to demonstrate our commitment to Gen Z, leveraging web3 technologies to supercharge the causes that matter most to them.”

Will the TV campaign (there’s lots of other media and events besides) appeal to our ‘digital optimists?”

Search me, but Saatchi seems to make a pretty good fist of it.

MAA creative scale: 6.5.

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About Stephen Foster

Stephen is a former editor of Marketing Week and London Evening Standard advertising columnist. He wrote City Republic for Brand Republic and is a partner in communications consultancy The Editorial Partnership.

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