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Facebook and Twitter will be big players in the brave new TV world, says report

Two new developments this week demonstrate the remorseless onward march of social media network Facebook and its potential for having even more impact on business and social lives than Google.

First of all, as mentioned in another story there’s David Cameron’s partnership with the network to invite members to put forward their ideas for UK spending cuts.

But perhaps more interesting is a report from media research firm Futurescape which suggests that one day soon Facebook and Twitter will be competing for massive TV ad budgets.

According to Futurescape, the television is already becoming a social device with Google TV, Yahoo Connected TV and pay TV operators racing to connect TV sets to the internet. And internet TV apps will allow viewers to access their social networks through the TV screen and discuss TV shows while they watch.

So social media will become more involved in TV shows in real time, to the extent that they could provide instant feedback on viewing figures and approval ratings that would be a supplement to Nielsen viewing data.

And Futurescape says that Facebook plans to target the $180 billion worldwide TV ad market and could find itself competing with Twitter, which among other things is estimated to be the fastest-growing search engine currently operating, although it is still tiny compared with Google.

The consultancy says that whoever wins the battle will have a dominant position in socially-targeted TV advertising, pay-TV content recommendation, TV show marketing, next generation EPGs and interactive viewing.

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About David O'Reilly

David is a former deputy editor of Campaign and writer for a number of leading titles including Management Today and the Sunday Times. He is a partner in The Editorial Partnership.
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